Full Members

BUNDESARCHITEKTENKAMMER E.V. / FEDERAL CHAMBER OF GERMAN ARCHITECTS (BAK)
Germany

ECTP-CEU member since: 2018
Amount of own members: 6.676 Spatial Planners
Prof. Ralf Niebergall / BAK Vice-president for European and international affairs
Delegate(s): Michael STEIN

Eu-verbindungsbüro brüssel / eu liaison office
85 avenue de nerviens (bte 10) . 1040 brüssel / brussels
T +32 2 219 77 30
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  . Www.bak.de


Annual BAK reports to ECTP-CEU

not yet


Germany’s projects presented by the BAK to the ECTP-CEU European and Regional Planning Awards:

not yet


Country Factsheet for Germany (.de)
ECTP-CEU Stage 2 Draft - Appendix 4 Draft Directory (2012-12-21)
General Country Information
Capital City Berlin
Population 82,438,000
Area (km2) 357 023
Population Density 231 per km2
EU Membership Germany joined what is now known as the EU as a founding member in 1957.

Germany is currently a federal parliamentary republic with sixteen constituent states; the President is the head of state, while the Chancellor is the head of government, and exercises the executive power.

 


Germany’s Ministry contacts:
(From the Federal Government website)

Following the federal state of Germany, Urban and Spatial planning are regionalized matters, with guidelines coming from the Federal level:
Bundesministerium für Umwelt, Bau, Naturschutz und Reaktorsicherheit
Stresemannstraße 128
10117 Berlin
Phone: +49 (0) 3018 305-0
Fax: +49 (0) 3018 305-4375

 


Planning as a Regulated Profession in Germany

As Urban and Spatial planning are regionalized matters in Germany; each of the country's states is competent for these matters within their respective territory.

Professional Title:
The common professional name is "Stadtplaner" (“Town Planner”).

EU Database Status:
The profession of planner in Germany is included in the EU Database of Regulated Professions, but without any information on the type of regulation.

National Regulation:
None.

Regional regulation:
There are 16 federal states in Germany, each with their own Chamber of Architects maintaining statutory registers of town planners. As a result, requirements may differ between Chambers.


Universities with approved trainings in Germany
The course leading to the profession of Urban Planner is particular in Germany; it combines a three year Bachelor in Spatial Planning, and a two year Master or a four year Bachelor in Spatial Planning and a one year Master in Spatial Planning.
These courses are provided, in Germany, by:
• Technical University of Berlin, Department of Urban and Regional Planning (ISR), School of Planning Building Environment
• Technische Universität Dortmund, School of Spatial Planning
• HafenCity University Hamburg, Urban Planning
• University of Kaiserslautern, Faculty of Spatial and Environmental Planning
• Technical University of Brandenburg Cottbus – Senftenberg, Urban and Regional Planning
• University of Kassel, School of Urban Planning and Landscape Planning
• University of Stuttgart, Institute for the Foundations of Planning, Architecture and Urban Planning
• University of Applied Science Nürtingen and Stuttgart, Department of Architecture and Design, Urban Planning
• University of Applied Science Erfurt, Stadt- und Raumplanung
• Bauhaus University Weimar, Architecture and Urbanism, Urbanistik

Example from “ECTP-CEU Draft Stage 2 Study on the Recognition of Planning Qualifications in Europe”:
Combined Study of spatial Planning at the Technical University of Dortmund's Faculty of Spatial Planning:

During the first four years there is a focus on the basic competencies, while the last year of Master is focused on the preparation of a specialist.
Dortmund is the only university with the combination of four years bachelor and one year master.


Town Planning Press of Germany

Town Planning
PLANERIN
RaumPlanung
Stadtbauwelt

Architecture
• Deutsches Architektenblatt
• Der Architekt
• Baukultur
• Immobilien Zeitung
• DETAIL
• ARCH+
• Bauwelt
• db – Deutsche Bauzeitung
• dbz – Deutsche Bauzeitschrift
• BauMeister
• Build


Country regulation:

SPATIAL PLANNING:

The main documentation about planning and territorial decisions lies in two fundamental documents:
• Federal level: Raumordnungspolitischer Orientierungs- und Handlungsrahmen
(Guidelines and operational framework for spatial planning )
• Länder level: Landesentwicklungsplan / -programme
(State development plan / programme )
• Regional level: Regionalplan, Gebietsentwicklungsplan
(Regional Plan)

Raumordnungspolitischer Orientierungs- und Handlungsrahmen:
They are federal action plans; they set out guiding principles for spatial development and a strategy for the whole of Germany. They also promote the polycentric spatial and settlement structures, and protect natural resources. Due to the spatial development changes, guidelines and framework are constantly updated through those plans.

Landesentwicklungsplan:
They are development plans which highlight the wish of spatial and structural development for the territory of a state (Länder). Names can change from state to state, as well as their preparing procedures; but general rules have been implemented for them thanks to the Federal Spatial Planning Act of 1998.

Regionalplan, Gebietsentwicklungsplan:
They are concerned by elaboration, integration and implementation of the goals of the state spatial planning. They must be conform to the state and federal spatial planning, but also mediate between those and local urban land-use planning. This coordination ensures that all planning levels won't be contradictory and assures a global continuity of the planning policy.


COMPETENT BODIES:

• Federal Government, State (Länder) government, and Local/Regional Government


PUBLIC PARTICIPATION AND COMMUNICATION

Information, consultation and dialogue
Citizens generally have access to the development and implementation of the preparatory land-use plan (Flächennutzungsplan) and the legally binding land-use plan (Bebauungsplan), which are the two municipal planning documents that must be approved by higher authorities.
The public must be informed as early as possible through public advertisement of the purpose of the plan and of all alternative proposals. At this moment, citizens are able to express their views and get clarifications. Public authorities and agencies concerned by the land-use planning also have to be informed.
The draft of land-use plan is then put on public display to allow recommendations and objections regarding the plan, which will be taken into account.


PLANNING LEGISLATION

Main Planning legislation
From Federal Building Code (Baugesetzbuch, BauGB), Chapter One, Part One, Subdivision One, Section 1:
“Land-use plans shall safeguard sustainable urban development and a socially equitable utilisation of land for the general good of the community, and shall contribute to securing a more humane environment and to protecting and developing the basic conditions for natural life”

From Federal Regional Planning Act (Raumordnungsgesetz, ROG), Subdivision One, Section 2:
“Regional planning shall be governed by the following principles:
• A well-balanced system of settlements and open spaces shall be developed in the entire territory of the Federal Republic of Germany. Provision shall be made to maintain a functioning ecosystem in built-up and non-built-up areas. Efforts shall be made to establish balanced economic, infrastructural, social, ecological and cultural conditions in the respective regions.
• The decentralized settlement structure of the territory as a whole with its large number of well-functioning centers and city regions shall be maintained. Building activities shall be concentrated in certain areas with a view to establishing a system of functioning central places. The re-use of derelict settlement areas shall be given priority over the use of open spaces.
(…)”


Websites
Die Bundesregierung:
http://www.bundesregierung.de/

Federal Ministry fort he Environment, Nature Conservation, Building and Nuclear Safety
www.bmub.bund.de

Vereinigung für Stadt-, Regional- und Landesplanung:
http://www.srl.de/

Die Akademie für Raumforschung und Landesplanung:
http://www.arl-net.de/

German Law Archive:
http://germanlawarchive.iuscomp.org/

Common Mindscapes of The Baltic Spatial Conceptshare:
http://www.commin.org/

Regulated Professions Database of the European Commission:
http://ec.europa.eu/internal_market/qualifications/regprof/index.cfm?action=homepage


Croatia - UDRUGA HRVATSKIH URBANISTA (UHU-ACUP)           

ECTP-CEU member since:           

Amount of own members: 169

President: Sandra JAKOPEC

Delegate(s): Sandra JAKOPEC

Contacts:           

Ulica Grada Vukovara 271/II

10000 Zagreb

Tel. : 385 1 3011 427

e-mail : This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Web:            http://www.uhu.hr


Annual UHU reports to ECTP-CEU


Croatia’s projects presented by the UHU-ACUP to the ECTP-CEU European and Regional Planning Awards:

2012 – 9th Edition:

•            Zagreb – Spansko-Oranice

2016 – 11th Edition:

•            Spatial Development Strategy of the Republic of Croatia


Country Factsheet for Croatia (.hr)

ECTP-CEU Study Profession qualification Recognition - Stage II document - Appendix 4 Draft Directory (2012-12-21)

General Country Information

Capital City: Zagreb

Population: 4.284.889

Area (km2): 56.594 and 31.067 (sea area)

Population Density: 76 per km2

EU Membership: Croatia joined what is now known as the EU in 2013.

Croatia is a republic under a parliamentary system, divided into 20 counties and the city of Zagreb, these counties are subdivided into 126 cities and the city of Zagreb and 429 municipalities; the spatial and urban planning matters are shared between those administrative levels.


Croatia’s Ministry contacts:

(From the Government website http://www.mgipu.hr )

“Ministarstvo graditeljstva i prostornoga uređenja” (Ministry of Construction and Physical Planning):

Ulica Republike Austrije 20,

10000 Zagreb

Tel: 01 3782 444 (centrala)

Fax: 01 3772 822


Planning as a Regulated Profession in Croatia

The regulation is indirectly operated by “HKA – Hrvatska komora arhitekata”, the Chamber of Croatian Architects.

Professional Title:The common professional name is “Ovlašteni arhitekt urbanist”, Authorised Architect – urbanist

EU Database Status:The profession of “Ovlašteni arhitekt urbanist” in Croatia is not included in the EU Database of Regulated Professions.

National Regulation:Indirect through the Chamber of Croatian Architects, which holds a register of those allowed to practice under this title.

Regional regulation:None.


Universities with approved trainings in Croatia

The courses leading to the profession of “Ovlašteni arhitekt /Ovlašteni arhitekt urbanist”, or town planner, are Third Level Degree in Planning. 

Those courses are provided, in Croatia, by:

•            University of Zagreb, Faculty of Architecture

•            University of Split, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Architecture and Geodesy

Example from “ECTP-CEU Draft Stage 2 Study on the Recognition of Planning Qualifications in Europe”:


Master of Architecture and Urbanism, University of Zagreb, Faculty of Architecture:

It is a four semesters course, based on matters such as:

•            Croatian Space and Architecture

•            Sustainable Construction

•            Spatial Planning

•            Urban Transformation

•            The History of European Urbanism

•            Modern Housing

•            Theory of Architecture


Town Planning Press of Croatia

•            Prostor

•            Čovjek i prostor

•            Oris

•            Sociologija i prostor

•            Život umjetnosti

•            Radovi instituta za povijest umjetnosti

•            Elektronički časopis e-GFOS

•            Turizam: međunarodni znanstveno-stručni časopis


Country regulation:

SPATIAL PLANNING:

Town Planning matters are divided between the three main competent levels in Croatia:

•            The National Level

•            The Regional Level

•            The Local Level

The National Level:

In order to harmonize spatial objectives and the organization of the State, the Croatian Parliament adopted the “Physical Planning Strategy and Programme of the State”. It determines the plans and documents that must adopted by the planning entities, and sets out objectives through guidelines and frameworks for the spatial development. Based on natural, economic, social and cultural matters, it integrates purpose and use of space with environmental protection.

The Regional Level:

Thanks to “County Physical Plans”, the regional spatial and economic matters are structured and settled to develop and protect natural, historical, and landscape values without ignoring the need of a stronger economy. These plans have to be approved by the ministry and in accordance with the national “Physical Planning Strategy”. The “Physical plans in areas with particular features” are made for national and nature parks, or for areas designated by the “Physical Planning Programme” or the “County Physical Plan”.

The Local Level:

There is “Physical Plan for the development of the municipality/city” on the local level, which sets out conditions to the use of space and protections to the environment, cultural monuments or any valuable part of the city. It is a local framework for land-use. Three others documents can complete this framework: the “Master Development Plan” that includes measures for environmental improvement and protection; the “Urban Development Plan” determines the possible uses for public spaces, such as streets or transport network; the “Detailed Development Plan” specifies methods and land development modes.


COMPETENT BODIES:

•            Parliament of the Republic, County Assembly, City Assembly, Town/Municipality Council or Assembly.


PUBLIC PARTICIPATION AND COMMUNICATION

Information, consultation and dialogue

All the departments that have activities related to the environment must integrate the public in their creation process of a planning document. These obligations come from the two principles of an integral approach and of coordinating the interests of the users of an area. State administration bodies and public authorities must provide data on the planning documents and organize a public discussion for each proposal of a physical and town plan. Everyone has the right to comment and make remarks, as well as they have the right to get an explanation on their rejection.

This public participation continues during its implementation, and even if it is reduced to the neighbours, they have a significant power of influence, including the right to a suspensive appeal.


PLANNING LEGISLATION

Main Planning legislation

From Physical Planning Act, 12 December 2013, General Provisions, Article 6, Goals of Physical Planning:

“(...)The goals of physical planning shall be:

1. even spatial development that is aligned with the economic, social and environmental aspects;

2. spatial sustainability in regards to the rational use and preservation of spatial capacities on land, sea and the seabed, with the objective of efficient space protection;

3. connecting the territory of the State with European systems of physical planning;

4. nurturing and developing regional spatial characteristics;

5. mutually aligned and complementary distribution of various human actions and activities in space in order to have functional and harmonised community development, while protecting the integral spatial values;

6. rational use and protection of natural goods, nature conservation, environmental protection and prevention from pollution risks;

7. protection of cultural assets and values;

8. well organised distribution and development of building land; (...)”


Websites

Udruga Hrvatskih Urbanista: http://www.uhu.hr 

Ministry of Construction and Physical Planning: http://www.mgipu.hr/

Croatian Institute for Spatial Development: http://www.hzpr.hr/

Government of the Republic of Croatia: https://vlada.gov.hr/

Supreme Court of the Republic of Croatia: http://www.vsrh.hr/

Regulated Profession Database of the European Commission: http://ec.europa.eu/internal_market/qualifications/regprof/index.cfm?action=homepage


 

Asociación Española de Técnicos Urbanistas (AETU)
Spain
ECTP-CEU member since: 1986
Amount of own members: 230
President: Pablo MOLINA
Delegate(s): Ignacio PEMÁN GAVÍN, Lluís BRAU
Contacts: Secretariat
carrer Avinyó 15
08002 Barcelona
Tel. +34 933 043 322
e-mail : This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Web: http://www.aetu.es

Annual AETU reports to ECTP-CEU

Spain’s projects presented by the AETU to the ECTP-CEU European and Regional Planning Awards:

2002 - 4th Edition:

• Valladolid – Land Planning Guidelines for Valladolid and its surroundings
Winner

2006 - 6th Edition:

• Sevilla – Integral Plan of the Poligono Sur of Sevilla
Special Mention
• Territorial Plan onf the functional Bajo Deba area
Special Mention
• Asturias Coastal Zone Protection Plan
Winner
• The Basque Regional Strategy
Winner

2008 - 7th Edition:

• Almonte – Almonte's PGOU (General Plan of Urban Development)
• Sarriguren – Ecocity of Sarriguren
Winner

2010 – 8th Edition:

• Barcelona – Transformation plan of La Mina neighbourhood in the Barcelona Conurbation
Winner

2012 – 9th Edition:

• Castilla y León – PRAU Program: Program for promoting Regional Urban Development Action Plans
Special Mention
• Madrid – Proyecto Madrid Centro
Winner

2014 - 10th Edition:

• Pontevedra – Walking does it
• Lleida – Lleida Agri-Food Science and Technology Park

Country Factsheet for Spain (.es)
ECTP-CEU Stage 2 Draft – Appendix 4 Draft Directory (2012-12-21)
General Country Information
Capital City Madrid
Population 46,662,000
Area (km2) 504 645
Population Density 92 per km2
EU Membership Spain joined what is now known as the EU in 1986.

Spain is a Constitutional Monarchy, composed of 17 autonomous communities and two autonomous cities; the constitution provides to those autonomous entities various degrees of autonomy.

Spain’s Ministry contacts:
(From the Government website)

“Ministerio de Fomento” (Ministry for Public Works):

Paseo de la Castellana, 67
Nuevos Ministerios
28071
Madrid
Phone: 915 977 000
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.,
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Contact form


Planning as a Regulated Profession in Spain

The regulation is indirectly operated by chambers or administrative bodies of the professions usually responsible for planning.

Professional Title:
The common professional name is "Urbanista".

EU Database Status:
The profession of “Urbanista” in Spain is not included in the EU Database of Regulated Professions.

National Regulation:
Indirect through the professional bodies of Architecture, Engineering and Geographers.
Regional regulation:
None.


Universities with approved trainings in Spain

The courses leading to the profession of “Urbanista”, or town planner, are Third Level Degree in Planning.
Those courses are provided, in Spain, by:
• Las Palmas de Gran Canaria University – Art, City and Territory Department Section of Town Planning
 Technical University of Madrid – Higher Technical School of Civil Engineering
 Technical University of Madrid – Urban & Regional Planning Department


Example from “ECTP-CEU Draft Stage 2 Study on the Recognition of Planning Qualifications in Europe”:

Master of Urban and Spatial Planning, Technical University of Madrid:


Here it isis a one year course relatively evenly spread over all criteria, but might need to be considered in conjunction with other qualifications.

 

Town Planning Press of Spain

• Revista de Derecho Urbanistico
• Ciudad y Territorio. Ministerio de Fomento:
• Urban. Escuela Técnica Superior de Arquitectura. Madrid
• La Ciudad Viva (LCV). Junta de Andalucía.
• Boletín de la Asociación de Geógrafos Españoles.
• El Croquis
• Arquitectura Viva
• Tectonica
• Materiales de Construccion
• Info Construccion
• EcoConstruccion
• Revista de Arquitectura
• Informes de la Construccion



Country regulation:
SPATIAL PLANNING:
Town Planning matters are divided between the two main competent levels in Spain, providing two kinds of documents:
• “Planeamiento Territorial” (Regional Planning)
• “Planeamiento Urbanistico” (Local Development Planning)

“Planeamiento Territorial” (Regional Planning):
These plans are set on a regional scale, they are general directives, and provide a framework on land and natural resources use. To reach the purpose of regional balance, they classify lands between three categories to specify what sort of use is possible: urban land, land to develop or unsuitable for development. It is then to the municipalities to implement this land classification into their administrative limits.

“Planeamiento Urbanistico” (Local Development Planning):
It represents the integration of the policies made by the regional government on the municipal level. The municipal decisions lie in the “Plan General Municipal” (local development plan), and can be detailed on specific matters in the “Plan de Desarollo” or “Derivado” (Detailed Local Development Plan). This level also includes public infrastructures, services or public spaces, such as parks, coasts, rivers … It is this local level which contributes to a form of legal certainty to the public, by detailing the requirements and the rules.

COMPETENT BODIES:

• Municipalities and Autonomous Communities

PUBLIC PARTICIPATION AND COMMUNICATION

Information, consultation and dialogue
A 1994 Law provides to citizens a direct participation in the formulation of Spatial Planning plans in all Autonomous Communities. It details that the public information is guaranteed for a period of not less than two months, when the plan has been drafted. There is a legal obligation to consult and hear the general public.
However, the law doesn't place any constraints to the participation, which could have implied to take into account the comments and observations made by the public. Therefore, it is to the local authorities to provide effective mechanisms or to force itself to improve the public participation, and thus, enhance the public involvement.


PLANNING LEGISLATION

Main Planning legislation
From Real Decreto Legislativo 2/2008, de 20 de junio -Texto Refundido de la Ley de Suelo-, Titulo Preliminar, Articulo 2:
“(...)
1. Las políticas públicas relativas a la regulación, ordenación, ocupación, transformación y uso del suelo tienen como fin común la utilización de este recurso conforme al interés general y según el principio de desarrollo sostenible, sin perjuicio de los fines específicos que les atribuyan las Leyes.”
(Public policies on regulation, management, occupation, land use change have the common purpose to use this resource in the public interest and to respect the principle of sustainable development, without prejudice to the final purposes assigned to such laws)

2. “En virtud del principio de desarrollo sostenible, las políticas a que se refiere el apartado anterior deben propiciar el uso racional de los recursos naturales armonizando los requerimientos de la economía, el empleo, la cohesión social, la igualdad de trato y de oportunidades entre mujeres y hombres, la salud y la seguridad de las personas y la protección del medio ambiente, contribuyendo a la prevención y reducción de la contaminación (...)”
(Under the principle of sustainable development, policies from the previous paragraph should encourage the rational use of natural resources by harmonizing the requirements of the economy, employment, social cohesion, equal treatment and opportunities for women and men, health and safety of people and protecting the environment, and contributing to the prevention and reduction of pollution)


Websites

Asociación Española de Técnicos Urbanistas:
http://aetu.es/
Ministerio de Fomento:
http://www.fomento.gob.es/
Boletin Oficial del Estado:
https://www.boe.es/
Congreso de los Diputados:
http://www.congreso.es/
Marine Policy and Marine Spatial Planning:
http://www.marineplan.es/
Regulated Profession Database of the European Commission:
http://ec.europa.eu/internal_market/qualifications/regprof/index.cfm?action=homepage
European Centre for Nature Conservation:
http://www.ecnc.org/

Asociace pro urbanismus a územní plánování České republiky (AUUP ČR)
Czech Republic


ECTP-CEU member since: 1990
Amount of own members: 245
President: Petr DURDIK
Delegate(s): Vít ŘEZÁČ , Filip NOVOSÁD
Contacts: Thákurova 7
CZ - 160 00 PRAHA 6
tel: +420.603.829.311
fax: +420.224.310.185
e-mail : This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Web: www.urbanismus.cz


Annual AUUP reports to ECTP-CEU

 


Czech Republic’s projects by ECTP-CEU European and Regional Planning Awards presented by AUUP:

2012 - 9th Edition:

• Kuks - Teatrum Mundi
• Uherske Hradiste
• National Park – Sumava

2010 – 8th Edition:

• Pisek - Reconstruction of promenade and regeneration of gothic moats

2008 - 7th Edition:

• Prague - River Tales – project of the urban development of the Rohansky Island Area


Country Factsheet for Czech Republic (.cz)
Amended ECTP-CEU Study Draft (2012-11-21)
General Country Information
Capital City Prague
Population 10,468,000
Area (km2) 78,866
Population Density 133 per km2
EU Membership Czech Republic joined what is now known as the EU in 2004.

Czech Republic is currently divided into thirteen regions and the capital; the country includes the historical territories of Bohemia, Silesia and Moravia and is a Constitutional Republic.


Czech Republic's Ministry contacts:
(From Ministry's website)

Ministry of Regional Development CZ :
Staroměstské náměstí 6
110 15 Praha 1
Tel.: +420 224 861 111 (switchboard)
Fax: +420 224 861 333 (downtown)
ID data box: 26iaava
Website : http://www.mmr.cz/en/Homepage


Planning as a Regulated Profession in Czech Republic
The competence on Urban and Space planning is divided between Municipalities (about 6250), Regions, the Ministry of Regional Development, and the Ministry of Defence.

Professional Title:
Autorizovaný architekt – územní plánování (obor A.2), Autorizovaný architekt - krajinářská architektura (obor A.3).

EU Database Status:
The profession of planner in Czech Republic is not included in the EU Database of Regulated Professions.

National Regulation:
Legal instrument on regulated professions: Act no. 360/1992 Coll., on Certified Architects and Certified Engineers and Technicians Active in Construction.
CKA (Česká komora architektů / Czech Chamber of Architects) is authorised by law (no. 360/1992 Coll.) to grant inclusion in a register of professional planners.


Universities with approved trainings in Czech Republic
Specific planning qualification not a prerequisite.
The courses leading to the profession of Town or Spatial Planners are provided by:
• Czech Technical University in Prague: Faculty of Architecture, Faculty of Civil Engineering
• Brno University of Technology: Faculty of Architecture, Faculty of Civil Engineering
• Technical University of Liberec: Faculty of Architecture
• Technical University of Ostrava: Faculty of Civil Engineering

Example from “ECTP-CEU Draft Stage 2 Study on the Recognition of Planning Qualifications in Europe”.
Master of Architecture and Urbanism, Czech Technical University in Prague's Faculty of Architecture:
Here it is a two year course with a heavy part on practice and spatial planning aspects, and less on planning theory and techniques.


Town Planning Press of Czech Republic:

1. Urbanismus a územní rozvoj, Ministry of Regional Development (www.uur.cz)
2. ERA 21, www.era21.cz
3. Bulletin ČKA, www.cka.cz
4. Aktuality AUUP ČR, www.urbanismus.cz


TOWN AND COUNTRY PLANNING IN THE CZECH REPUBLIC:

PLANNING LEGISLATION

Main planning legislation
The most important law governing town and country planning and construction authorisation in the Czech Republic is Act no. 183/2006 Coll. on town and country planning and the building code (Building Act), as amended.
From : 1st January 2007
Town and Country Planning Objectives
Town and country planning creates preconditions for construction and sustainable territorial development. Its objective is to achieve general beneficial harmony of public and private priorities in territorial development. Town and country planning with the public interest in mind protects and further develops the natural, cultural, and civic values of land, including the urban, architectural, and archaeological heritage, while protecting the landscape at the same time.
Town and Country Planning Tasks
The main task of town and country planning is to identify and asses the land condition and its values, to determine the territorial development strategy and use and spatial requirements, to examine and asses the required territorial changes, to create conditions for risk reduction with regard to environmental and natural disasters and for the elimination of its impacts, or to specify necessary redevelopment interventions. Another task of town and country planning is to assess the impacts of different concepts on sustainable spatial development.


TOWN AND COUNTRY PLANNING INSTRUMENTS:

Town and country planning instruments are used to promote the tasks and objectives of town and country planning on a national, regional, and local level. Town and country planning instruments include spatial development policy, planning data and documentation, planning permission and its proceedings, planning measures on building bans and planning measures on redevelopment, pre-emption rights and compensation for alteration within the area.

Spatial Development Policy
Spatial development policy stipulates the Republic’s priorities of town and country planning, determines development areas and axes, and specific areas and corridors of the transport and technical infrastructure of national importance. Spatial development policy is compulsory for the whole territory of the Republic and is approved by the Government. It is binding for procurement and issuance of development principles, plans, regulatory plans, and for decision-making in the area.

Development Principles
Development principles delimit the areas and corridors of supra local importance and determine the requirements for their utilization, plus they coordinate the planning activities of municipalities. Development principles are procured for the whole territory of the administrative region. They are binding for procurement and issuance of the plans, regulatory plans and for decision-making in the area.
Plan
The plan determines the basic concept of the development of the municipality, protection of its values, its areal and spatial arrangement, and arrangement of the landscape. The plan delimits the developed area, areas with development potential and the areas delimited for the alteration of existing development, and determines the conditions for utilization of these areas. The procurement of the plan is not mandatory. If it is procured, it applies to the whole territory of the municipality and it is binding for issuance of the regulatory plan and for decision-making within the area.

Regulatory Plan
The regulatory plan determines the detailed conditions for the use of the grounds and for the location and spatial arrangement of structures (e.g. the street lines and height of structures). The procurement of the regulatory plan is not mandatory. If it is procured, it applies to the given territory of the municipality and it is binding for decision-making within the area.
Planning Analytical Materials
The planning analytical materials contain the ascertainment and assessment of the state and development of the area, its values and limitations, programmes for executing the changes in the area, assessing the area sustainable development, and determination of problems for solution. It is mandatory for all regions and municipalities to procure planning analytical materials. They are not binding, however, they form the basis for the planning documentation. The materials are continuously updated.

Planning Study
The Planning study suggests, examines and considers possible solutions of selected problems or selected parts of the area. Planning studies are procured as needed, for selected parts of the area. They are not binding, however, they form the basis for decision-making.

TOWN AND COUNTRY PLANNING SYSTEM:

The land planning system in the Czech Republic is hierarchical. Higher level planning documentation is binding for the lower level planning documentation. Lower level planning documentation conflicting with subsequently commissioned higher level documentation shall not apply. Generally, the higher level planning documentation should not include details concerning issues that belong to the lower level, which involves more detailed documentation. The scope of competence of different planning authorities is hierarchical as well – from the ministries to the regional and local authorities.


COMPETENT BODIES:

• Ministry of Regional Development (provide the spatial development policy and methodical support)
• Ministry of Defence (planning in army areas)
• Regional Government Authorities (provide protection and value development of a region)
• Municipal Authorities (provide protection and value development of the municipal territory; submitted to the regional documents)

 


PUBLIC PARTICIPATION AND COMMUNICATION

Participants in Planning
The planning process involves politicians (they initiate the procurement of planning documentation and decide on its approval), officials (e.g. municipal offices with extended powers procure plans and relevant authorities comment on them) and designers (who process the documentation). Processing of planning documentation or of planning permission documentation or project documentation as well as professional construction supervision will only be carried out by authorized individuals.
The process of issuance of binding planning documentation involves the engagement of the general public (citizens and civil society organizations). Real estate owners may present objections to the draft documentation and anyone may present their comments.
All comments and objections must be addressed. The general public is in some cases actively engaged in the creation of planning documentation.


TOWN PLANNING MATTERS:

Only authorised planners are entitled to elaborate plans.
Considered as a part of the architectural profession, the Czech Chamber of Architects (CKA) and the Czech Chamber of Civil Engineers (CKAIT) are authorized by law to grant inclusion in a register of professional planners. An architecture or civil engineering degree is required.

 


Websites

MMR, Ministry of Regional Development of Czech Republic:
http://www.mmr.cz/en/Homepage

UUR, Institute for Spatial Development (Ústav územního rozvoje):
http://www.uur.cz/ 

AUUP ČR, Association for Urban and Regional Planning of the Czech Republic:
www.urbanismus.cz 

ČKA, Czech Chamber of Architects:
www.cka.cz 


Eesti Planeerijate Ühing (EPÜ) 
Estonia

ECTP-CEU member since: 2009
Amount of own members: 90
President: Head of the board
Heiki Kalberg
Delegate(s): Maila Kuusik
Contacts: EPÜ Secretariat
Raekoja plats 8
TARTU 51014
Tel : +372.7.427.777/+372.51.48.308
Fax : +372.7.427.777
e-mail : This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Web: www.planeerijad.ee 

 


Annual EPU reports to ECTP-CEU

Estonian’s projects presented by the EPÜ to the ECTP-CEU European and Regional Planning Awards:
None to date


Country Factsheet for Estonia (.ee)
ECTP-CEU Study Profession qualification Recognition - Stage II document - Appendix 4 Draft Directory (2012-12-21)
General Country Information
Capital City Tallinn
Population 1,342,000
Area (km2) 45 226
Population Density 30 per km2
EU Membership Estonia joined EU in 2004.

Estonia is a parliamentary republic administratively divided into fifteen regions (counties) and appr 220 local authorities (towns and rural municipalities); the spatial planning matters are shared between the different levels of the State (National, Regional, Local).


Estonia’s Ministry contacts:
(From the Government website)

Ministry of Finance (Rahandusministeerium):
Tallinn 10122
Endla 13
Telephone: (+372) 611 3558
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


Planning as a Regulated Profession in Estonia

Professional Title:
The common professional name is "Planeerija".

EU Database Status:
The profession of “Planeerija” in Estonia is not included in the EU Database of Regulated Professions.

National Regulation:
The Planning Act paragraph 6 prescribes that: a planner is a person who has a masters degree in geography, architecture or landscape architecture or a person who has been given the professional certificate as planner.

The Planning Act paragraph 4 section 7 prescribes that: In case the professional qualification of EU and EEA is approved, the Act of approval of foreign professional certificate will be applied. The relevant authority is Ministry of Finance.
The Planning Act paragraph 4 section 6 prescribes the competence of a planner:

The planner and other specialists participating in preparation of a plan must:
1) possess the knowledge and skills corresponding to the specific nature of the work
2) be guided by carefulness in order to guarantee a good quality to the plan and take into consideration the presented requirements.
3) be guided by the obligation to give explanations including providing information to the organisers of the planning activity or other interested persons concerning issues relevant for the planning work.
4) guarantee that the plan is in accordance with legislation.

The professional standards for the planner are approved by the Cultural Council (Kultuurinõukogu) appointed by the Minister of Education and Science 28.03.2012
http://www.kutsekoda.ee/et/kutseregister/kutsestandardid/10424926 

The professional certificat is issued by the Association of Estonian Planners since 22.11.2014.
Regional regulation: None.


Universities with approved trainings in Estonia

In Estonia, no comprehensive curriculum in spatial planning is currently provided. Planning is thought as a sub-subject in several universities.
Planning and planning-related courses are provided, in Estonia, by:
• Estonian University of Life Science, https://www.emu.ee/en/
• University of Tartu, http://www.ut.ee/en
• Estonian Academy of Arts, http://www.artun.ee/en/
• Tallinn University, http://www.tlu.ee/en
• Tallinn University of Technology, http://www.ttu.ee/en

Example from “ECTP-CEU Draft Stage 2 Study on the Recognition of Planning Qualifications in Europe”:
Master of Urban Studies, Estonian Academy of Arts:
Here it is a two year course with a heavier part on planning product and thesis, like other courses in countries with a strong tradition of architecture and engineering in spatial planning.


Town Planning Press of Estonia

The following journals are occasionally publishing articles and overviews about plans and planning:

• Sirp
http://www.sirp.ee/

• MAJA
http://www.solness.ee/maja/?lng=2

• ÕU
http://ou.edicy.co/valiruumi-ajakiri-ou

 


Country regulation:

SPATIAL PLANNING:

Town Planning matters are divided between the different competent levels in Estonia, providing four types of documents:
• “Üleriigiline planeering” (National Spatial Plan)
• “Maakonnaplaneering” (County Plan)
• “Üldplaneering” (Comprehensive Plan)
• “Detailplaneering” (Detailed Plan)

“Üleriigiline planeering” (National Spatial Plan):
It is a document prepared with the aim of defining the objectives in development matters on the national scale. It provides guidelines for a sustainable spatial development through the creation of the basis for transport network, infrastructures, and the regional development of the State.
Maritine areas can be dealt with in the form of a thematic plan covering both the territorial waters and the economic zone.

The National Spatial Plan "Estonia 2030+" was enforced by the Government in August 2012.

“Maakonnaplaneering” (County Plan):
A County Plan has the same purpose than the National Plan but on a smaller level. It is prepared for the territory of a county, as a whole or not. Unlike the National Plan, it can be created without covering all parts of the county, or be based on a theme if another county plan exists. Thanks to an agreement between the different parties, a county plan can integrate several counties. It ensures sustainable and balanced development while responding to the national and local needs.
The County plans were initiated by the Government in July 2013 and are being prepared by all County administrations. The plans should be finalized by the end of 2016.

“Üldplaneering” (Comprehensive Plan):
It determines general objectives for the development of cities or more rural areas and sets out the bases for the creation of the last listed plan. It can concern several cities, or being created for a special theme for example; more and more thematic plans are created on matters such as coastal areas, cultural sites or green systems. This Plan determines the general use of the land and defines locations for the public structures and networks, while promoting sustainable development and natural protection. It can be seen with buildings exclusion zones.

“Detailplaneering” (Detailed Plan):
Usually prepared for small areas, this plan sets out rules and divisions of new building areas. It establishes the architectural and natural frameworks that must be followed, thanks to drawing illustrations of the content of the plan. It also determines the needs for easements, which can only be created with the agreement of the owner.


COMPETENT BODIES:

• Ministry of Finance since 01.09.2015 (Ministry of Internal Affairs before, Ministry of Environment before),
• County Governor


PUBLIC PARTICIPATION AND COMMUNICATION

Information, consultation and dialogue
From “Planeerimisseadus” (Planning Act), 1st July 2015, Chapter 2, § 9 and 10:
§ 9. Principle of inviting the public to participate and of informing the public
(1) The planning proceedings are public. The authority that organises planning work must inform the public of the planning proceedings in understandable terms, provide sufficient invitation to the public to participate in the proceedings and, in the course of the preparation of the spatial plan, arrange public displays and public discussions of the plan in order to introduce the plan to the public.
(2) Everyone is entitled to participate in the planning proceedings and, during those proceedings, express his or her opinion regarding the spatial plan.
(3) Everyone is entitled, free of charge, to receive relevant information regarding the planning proceedings and the spatial plan.
§ 10. Principle of balancing and integrating interests
(1) The authority that organises planning work must balance different interests, including public interests and values, consider them in the light of the principles of planning and the goals of the spatial plan, and integrate them in the planning solution.
§ 11. Principle of the sufficiency of information: The authority that organises planning work is entitled, free of charge, to receive information required for the preparation of spatial plans. The authority must ensure the preservation and availability of the information gathered during planning proceedings.

The Act prescribes cooperation between government ministries and agencies in the initial phase of planning and that the plan should later be remitted to them.

Further all those who must be invited to participate and heard concerning the plan are enumerated. The authorities in question different according type of plan.

 


PLANNING LEGISLATION

Main Planning legislation

The Planning Act Chapter 1, paragraph 1 prescribes the aim and scope of planning regulation:

(1) The aim of this act is, considering the needs and interests of general public, to provide through spatial planning preconditions for a democratic, long time, balanced spatial development, land use, high class living and built up environment as well as promoting economically, culturally and socially sustainable development.
(2) The act prescribes the principles for planning, the requirements for the planning process and for the implementation on the plan.


Paragraph 4 sections 1 and 2 prescribe who is entitled to be the organizing authority of the planning work and its duties:

(1) The organizing authority of planning activity is according to competence the Ministry of Finance or other Government agency, the County governer or a Local authority unit.
(2) The duties of the organizing authority in the planning work are:
1) guarantee the provision of adequate plans for an area
2) organise the preparation of plans
3) preparation of plans or ordering preparation of plans.
4) guarantee the necessary procedures for the planning process,
5) assessment of the economic, cultural, social and natural environment impacts caused by implementation of the plan, i a organizing of strategic environment impact assessment.
6) observing, examining and implementation concerning legally put duties for the organizing authority of planning activity.

 


Websites

Eesti Planeerijate Ühing (Estonian Association of Spatial Planners):
www.planeerijad.ee

Rahandusministeerium (Ministry of Finance):
www.fin.ee

Maa-Amet (Estonian Land Board):
http://www.maaamet.ee/

Riigi Teataja:
www.riigiteataja.ee

Regulated Profession Database of the European Commission:
http://ec.europa.eu/internal_market/qualifications/regprof/index.cfm?action=homepage