About

The Town Planners' Liaison Committee

Preamble
(Source: Statutes of the International Association SEPLIS)

The right of professionals to practise, as foreseen under the Treaty of Rome (EEC 1957), created a number of problems for the freedom of the Liberal Professions to offer services in terms of the criteria for training and adapting their profession in the Member States.

To address this issue, the European Commission set up a department for the Liberal Professions in 1960, with J. P. de Crayencour as its Director. This department was dissolved when the United Kingdom, Denmark and Ireland joined the EEC in January 1973 and the number of Member States rose from six to nine. As a result, the representatives of the various Liberal Professions within Liaison Committees no longer had any direct contact with the Commission.

After leaving the Commission, J. P. de Crayencour therefore launched an appeal for a European Secretariat for the Liberal Professions (SEPLIS). This secretariat was created in 1974 as a result of initiatives taken by various Liaison Committees for the Liberal Professions (architects, lawyers, pharmacists etc) who were later joined by the Interprofessional Federations of the Member States.

The Town Planners Liaison Committee
(Source: ECTP directory 1988)

The Liaison Committee for Town Planners in the EEC, bringing together the various national institutes and associations of planners in the member countries, was founded within the International Society of City and Regional Planners (ISoCaRP). At the end of the nineteen sixties, ISoCaRP assigned the Belgian delegation, and R. Verbanck (of Ghent) in particular, to formulate a constitution for this Liaison Committee. P. Puttemans (of Brussels) became the Secretary General at the end of the nineteen seventies, M. Delvaux (of Brussels) took over in 1982. The Liaison Committee for Town Planners became an International Association with a scientific purpose under Belgian law, and its statutes were published in the Moniteur Belge on 12 July 1979 (Royal Decree of 26 April 1979).

The Liaison Committee for the various Liberal Professions are members of SEPLIS, which is the official partner of the Economic and Social Committee (ESC) of the European Community (EC). These Liaison Committees are therefore the official channel of representation for the Liberal Professions with the European Community institutions.

Since the Liaison Committee for Town Planners was set up, the professions themselves have been responsible for preparing the documentation intended for the European Commission, with the aim of furthering the free movement and the right of establishment of their professions in all Member States. M. Lahousse (of Brussels), the delegate of Liaison Committee for Town Planners to SEPLIS and the ESC, strengthened the working relations between these bodies. The Liaison Committee was also helped by Messrs Hartley and Calvez of the Council of Europe in Strasbourg.

Through its Secretary General, J. P. de Crayencour, SEPLIS advised the Liaison Committee for Town Planners and suggested ways of making headway in organising free movement for the professions without a European Directive specifically applied to town planners. Originally the Committee had favoured the formal concept of a European Directive. Subsequently, though, during a meeting between the Liaison Committee and representatives of the European Commission (J. J. Beuve-M+ry), the latter stated that it had been decided not to draft a Directive specifically for the town planning profession, as the Commission saw this as a non-regulated profession.

The Liaison Committee for Town Planners therefore decided to establish common rules for the profession between the national institutes and associations of Town Planners in all Member States of the EC. These rules are based on levels of training, codes of professional conducts and competence mutually recognised by all the members associations of town planners.

The European Council of Town Planners

These aims are embodied in the Charter (International Agreement and Declaration by the national associations and institutes of Town Planners in the European Community) founding the European Council of Town Planners. On 8 November 1985, the national associations of town planners which had been members of the Liaison Committee for Town Planners signed the ECTP Charter in Amsterdam and became members of ECTP. Presidents H. Crawford (of Edinburgh) and G. Franken (of Rotterdam) were responsible for the conversion of the Liaison Committee for Town Planners into ECTP.

ECTP is an International Association with a scientific purpose under Belgian law, and its statutes were published in the Moniteur Belge on 16 June 1988 (Royal Decree of 8 March 1988). Its registered office was, and still is, in Brussels.

Each national association of town planners in membership of ECTP has agreed to abide by the Charter and has pledged to respect and apply its terms. The role of ECTP is to provide a common platform for those exercising the profession of town planner, in whatever domain, in the countries of the European Union. At the same time, ECTP fulfils the role of Liaison Committee for town planners within SEPLIS for the Liberal Professions.

September 1995

H. CRAWFORD
M. DELVAUX
M. LAHOUSSE
Présidents

International Agreement and Declaration by the National Institutes and Associations of Professional Town Planners within the European Economic Community

WHEREAS

    1. The quality of the physical, social and economic organisation of countries, regions and urban and rural areas is a matter of major concern to the public and to responsible authorities within the Community and each Member State.
    2. These authorities recognise the crucial role of national, regional and local physical land use planning in achieving and maintaining physical, social and economic organisation and environmental quality.
    3. The ability of physical land use planning to play this role is dependent upon the existence and availability at all levels in both the public and private sectors of competent and responsible town planners.
    4. It is in the public interest that those using the services of town planners should be aware of, and entitled to rely upon, criteria of competence and conduct observed and recognised throughout the Community.
    5. There are no existing legal obstacles to the free movement and right of establishment of town planners within Member States of the Community but there are substantial differences as between the various Member States of the Community in the definition, purpose, role, scope,

THE UNDERSIGNED NATIONAL INSTITUTES AND ASSOCIATIONS OF PROFESSIONAL TOWN PLANNERS in the Member States believe that it is urgently necessary to join in seeking harmonisation of all matters relating to the town planning profession throughout the Community and have agreed, in particular, to collaborate in establishing criteria of professional competence and conduct which will be observed by their members and recognised by others, and therefore AGREE and DECLARE:

  1. That the undersigned national Institutes and Associations of professional town planners in the Member States will formulate a definition of the `professional town planner' by reference to the field and nature of his activities; to his competence, in terms of his required training and experience; to his professional ethics, in terms of the code of professional conduct to which he is subject; and to his membership of his national Institute or Association.
  2. That the elements of this definition will be embodied in Appendices to this Agreement and Declaration specifying:
    1. the field and nature of the professional town planner's activities;
    2. educational and training criteria; and
    3. professional and conduct requirements
  3. That this definition shall constitute the minimum recognisable criteria of a `professional town planner' throughout the Community and may be exemplified by a distinctive symbol.
  4. That those who meet this definition shall be mutually recognised as `professional town planners' by the undersigned national Institutes and Associations throughout the Community; that the national Institutes and Associations shall be free to prescribe higher standards for their members and that the minimum standard may be raised from time to time by agreement between the national Institutes and Associations.
  5. That the undersigned national Institutes and Associations will work towards the harmonisation of their requirements as to education, training and professional conduct with a view to achieving, in due course, mutual recognition of their membership requirements and qualifications.
  6. That the undersigned national Institutes and Associations will work towards the harmonisation of relevant courses of study and levels of education offered by the academic institution in the respective Member States and towards the establishment of a European commission on education and training in town planning.
  7. That the undersigned national Institutes and Associations will co-operate in exchanging information and in promoting contacts between their members and with other, relevant organisations.
  8. That the undersigned national Institutes and Associations will collaborate in identifying major town planning and environmental issues of European significance and in formulating recommendations for action.
  9. That the undersigned national Institutes and Associations will establish a Liaison Committee to act as a forum through which to achieve the aims of this Declaration, to act as a point of reference between the town planning profession and the institutions of the Community and to assist the promotion and recognition of the town planning profession in each Member State and in the Community.
  10. That the undersigned national Institutes and Associations will welcome the adherence to this Agreement and Declaration of other relevant national Institutes and Associations in the Member States, their co-operation and support in achieving its aims and their membership of the Liaison Committee.

APPENDIX A:

THE FIELD AND NATURE OF THE PROFESSIONAL TOWN PLANNER'S

ACTIVITIES

  1. Town Planning is the process known variously as Town and Country or Urban and Regional Planning, Environmental Planning, Land Use Planning and Physical Planning.
  2. The Field and Nature of Town Planning
    Town Planning embraces all forms of development and land use activities. It operates in all social strata and on several inter-related spatial levels - local, rural, suburban urban, metropolitan, regional, national and international. It is concerned with the promotion, guidance, enhancement and control of development in the constantly changing physical environment in the interest of common good but respecting the rights of the individual.

It makes provision for the future; helps reconcile conflicts of interest, projects physical and social change, facilitates the harmonious evolution of communities and initiates action for the optimum use of resources. It is both a management and a creative activity. It is a catalyst in conserving and developing the present and future structure and form of urban and rural areas. It contributes to the creation of the present and future character of social, physical, economic organisation and environmental quality.

Town Planning is not determinist. It seeks to establish balance and harmony. It draws attention to the possible options, it safeguards freedom of choice for the present and the future. It is so conceived as to be able to adapt to the evolution of circumstances.

Town Planning is rarely an independent process; it must take account of external decisions. It works through and negotiates with the decision making mechanisms of society's political institutions and public and private sectors. Public participation is an indispensable element in the process. By virtue of its direct involvement with people and their day to day activities, Town Planning inevitably has strong political overtones .

The Skills Required of the Town Planner

Because Town Planning demands a multidisciplinary approach to integrate these complex social, cultural, technical, economic, political and ecological elements, Town Planners are distinguished by their ability to work in teams of Town Planners, with other professions and with representatives of groups concerned with the evolution of the social framework. The methods of Town Planning comprise analysis and synthesis, proposition and programming, creative design, management and administrative skills. Prescribed training followed by continuing professional practice ensure that professional Town Planners have the required competence.

The Work of Town Planners

Whether self-employed, contracted or salaried, independent or an employee, engaged in practice or research, in the public or the private sector, the Town Planner principally undertakes the following tasks, either wholly or in part:

  • identifying the present and future needs of the community and drawing attention to opportunities, effects, constraints and implications of actions
  • proposing policies and plans for initiating, regulating, adapting, enabling and implementing change, having regard to guidance from research
  • designing spatial concepts of the policies and plans for development
  • negotiating towards the realisation of these policies and plans
  • continuously guiding, controlling and implementing these policies and plans in accordance with changing needs and opportunities
  • evaluating and monitoring the effects and implications of actual changes as they occur
  • giving a lead to research and ensuring training schemes

THE FIELD AND NATURE OF THE PROFESSIONAL TOWN PLANNER'S ACTIVITIES

(Appendix A 'The Charter')

The Town planner is

  • a researcher
  • a practitioner
  • a proposer of policies and programmes of action
  • a designer of projects, and
  • an implementer

Among the Fields of planning, the Town Planner may contribute to the following activities

 

RESEARCH PROGRAMS

POLICIES/ DESIGN


CONCEPTUAL

 

IMPLEMENTATION

Economic Development (Urban & Rural)

Technical resource surveys & appraisal

Strategic integrated physical and economic plans

Integrated physical & economic structure

Monitoring employment generation programs and incentives

Socio-economic surveys and appraisal Priority development projects National, regional and local (urban and rural)  
Land use and environmental impact studies Specific regional development projects Land use standards and regulations Development control regulations
      Environmental protection measures for pollution control
      Community participation

Social Planning Provisional Facilities

Population survey and Analysis Integrated development plans Structure and Neighbourhood development plans for new towns, new communities, inner city revitalisation and rural areas Integrated project funding
Projections     Monitoring
Provision of Facilities      

Housing

Technical surveys demand forecasting Priorities and options for accommodating housing need in urban and rural areas. Land use development plans Finance and Management Strategies
Local provision of support facilities   Neighbourhood plans (urban and rural)  

Renewal (Urban and Rural)

Technical surveys and analysis Options Urban Development and Renewal plans and projects Financial incentives
Capability Studies Investment Policies Financial and social considerations Rural reclamation and rehabilitation projects Revolving funds Continuous monitoring and corporate management
Neighbourhood analysis      

Transportation

Demand forecasting

National, regional, multi-modal transportation plans Plans
Investment Policies

Integrated land use transportation Technical detailing and finance schemes
Provision of facilities Traffic origin and destination surveys   Land use and traffic management plans Traffic/energy/ conservation measures Development control regulations
Environmental and land use impact appraisals      

Energy

Technical studies of resources Integrated national energy strategy On-site standards regulations for use and re-instatement Environmental protection measures and monitoring
Demand analysis and forecasting Options for provision of requirements and priorities Neighbourhood layout and energy conservation schemes Management schemes
Environmental Impact studies Environmental Protection measures    
Methods of waste disposal and derelict landscape conservation Schemes for Energy which are in the interest of public safety    
Rehabilitation      

Communications

Demand forecasting, network surveys and information technology Communication models Specific site and land use arrangements Impact appraisals - continuous monitoring
Provision of facilities and systems Investment strategies    
Impact appraisals      

Landscape

Land use and resource survey Landscape protection and development Landscape design and site planning projects Environmental protection measures and monitoring
Natural environment survey and analysis      

Conservation

Studies of the natural and man-made environments Conservation area designation Conservation plans from the man-made and natural environments Financial incentives land use and development control
Natural environment surveys and analysis Conservation Projects    
  Conservation policies    

Recreation and Tourism

Technical surveys Growth potential plan Location strategies Initiatives
Demand forecasting Investment strategies Site planning Management schemes
Impact appraisal Recreation schemes    
  Tourism schemes    

Legal Aspects

Legislation codes and regulations Integrated development plans Budget allocation for objectives Legal proceedings
  Compensation issues     Court hearings
  Co-ordination of related technical expertise     Planning Inquiries
        Public participation

Footnote

The range of activities covered by the profession differs in each member State of the Community. Within each member state, individual planners may choose to specialise in particular types of activity

APPENDIX B:

EDUCATION AND TRAINING

  1. Appendix B is a statement of the training of the European Town Planner. The purpose of the training of professional Town Planners is to enable them to acquire and maintain the skills necessary for the practice of the profession as defined by Appendix A (The Field and Nature of the Professional Town Planner's Activities) and in accordance with Appendix C (Professional Conduct Requirements). It is left to the institution involved to define the methods used.
  2. The status and competence of professional Town Planners requires a training aimed at developing the ability to identify problems and devise solutions
    1. by assimilating the interdependent knowledge of a physical, spatial, technical, social, cultural, economic and political nature,
    2. through an understanding of all the processes involved in planning and in the related disciplines and professions which contribute to planning
    3. through an introduction to analysis, projects and concepts, synthesis, programming, decision making and implementation.
  3. The content of the training shall
  4. encompass and deal with various spatial scales and different time horizons
  5. relate to different living contexts and environments - urban, rural, developed and developing
  6. evaluate and incorporate new developments in techniques and professional practice
  7. consist of academic study and practical experience
  8. encompass the study of the field of Town Planning and Development including the contribution made to Town Planning by other disciplines
  9. include a minimum common core of subjects to be adopted by the Council from time to time which defines the minimum level and quality of the training
  10. The Organisational Structure of the Training shall be as follows
  11. the training should be at university level
  12. the training should bc organised within the framework of:
  13. an undergraduate programme consisting of a minimum of 6 years of training including 4 years full time academic study or equivalent and 2 years practical experience in an approved practice or in research; or,
  14. a postgraduate programme consisting of a minimum of 4 years of training including 2 years of full time academic study or equivalent and 2 years practical experience in an approved practice or in research
  15. contributions from related disciplines should be integrated into the training throughout the entire period of study through teaching programmes, teachers or postgraduate students
  16. professional planners should form part of the teaching body in order to bring about a balance between theoreticians and practitioners
  17. teaching centres should also provide for academic research and higher academic qualifications in the field of Town Planning and Development
  18. Any specialisation of professional Town Planners in a particular area of Town Planning may take place either before the postgraduate Town Planning course of study or subsequent to the undergraduate Town Planning course of study or simultaneously with and as a part of the Town Planning course of study
  19. Complementary training courses in Town Planning shall be organised for the continuing professional development of Town Planners, the training of technicians who assist professional Town Planners, and increasing awareness of members of related professions.

SUPPLEMENT TO APPENDIX B OF THE EUROPEAN TOWN PLANNERS' CHARTER

THE COMMON CORE FOR PLANNING EDUCATION AND TRAINING

ECTP defines the minimum common core of education and training needed for the planning profession.

This common core is an integral part of Appendix B of the European Town Planners' Charter, and a fundamental part of the planning profession in Europe.

The language and the order used are formulated in such a way that any European planning school can interpret the common core as appropriate for its own educational requirements.

  1. ENVIRONMENTAL CONTEXT

    Perception and appreciation of the physical, natural, human, social, economic and built environments. Knowledge and understanding of the various mechanisms involved in local development, and in creation and use of space, society, the development of the natural environment, the principles of sustainable development and knowledge of local traditions. Understanding of the needs of the individual.

  2. THEORY AND METHODOLOGY OF PLANNING

    Planning history and philosophy; theory; stakeholders' interests, notions of space and time. Urban policies, town and country planning, city planning: parameters and methodologies, application, synthesis, management, evaluation. Selection and design of tools applicable to urban processes and strategies of agents. Knowledge of potential contribution from other disciplines and appropriate methods for evaluation of public policy. Research training. Understanding the dynamic processes underlying the development of human settlements.

  3. INSTITUTIONAL FRAMEWORK

    Planning law and relevant systems of government and planning administration at national and local level; mechanisms operating in the local economy; significance and legal framework of local practice, understanding and critical analysis of differences between countries. Knowledge and understanding of interrelationships between various levels: national, regional, local, and their particular characteristics. General knowledge of statistical sources, main financial context and indicators of finite resources (human, physical, economic).

  4. PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE AND TECHNIQUES
    • Demonstrate the particular importance of planning methods, definition of needs, projection and anticipation of future needs. Strategies. Project formulation and simulation. Evaluation of possible results. Ability to work with inter-disciplinary teams, public relations, conflict resolution, fundamentals of applied law; management and co-ordination of the planning process. Plan preparation and adoption. Site planning and plan-making.
    • Understanding of aesthetic values. Basis of the design process; urban design; town plans; comprehensive development plans.
    • Communication techniques: form, content and method of communication with related professions, people and government. Communication methods and skills (spoken, graphic, written, computer).
  5. PROFESSIONAL MATTERS

    Demonstration of knowledge, approach and competence of professional planners. The planner's responsibility, ethics/responsibility/hierarchy. Practice guidelines. Codes of professional conduct. Promotion of professional standards, professional organisation.

Text adopted by the General Assembly of the ECTP in Athens November 1995

APPENDIX C

PROFESSIONAL CONDUCT REQUIREMENTS

  1. Professional Town Planners shall conduct themselves in such a manner as to uphold the reputation of the profession in general and their Institute or Association in particular. They shall respect and uphold the professional ethics of the Institutes or Associations of each of the EEC Member States within which they undertake work.
  2. Each Institute or Association will draft its own detailed Code of Professional Conduct. This will embody the following Principles, to which all Town Planners in the EEC Member States agree to subscribe:
    • Competence To take reasonable steps to maintain professional competence at all times, including adhering to advice promulgated by their Institute or Association. Town Planners must ensure that they are well informed about the needs of all sections of society.
    • Responsibility To act always in the client's or employer's best interests, provided that the interests of the community shall be paramount; to make full reports and disclosures of all relevant, known facts, risks and consequences.
    • Integrity To safeguard the trust bestowed by the client; not to misuse privileged information; to avoid conflict of professional interest and to ensure that all statements made constitute bona fide professional opinion.
    • Fellowship To seek to eliminate all forms of discrimination; to rely solely on professional capability to obtain commissions; not to seek to supplant another practitioner; and always to notify a previous practitioner on being approached to proceed with work on which such practitioner had been engaged. To work in teams and collaborate with other Town Planners as appropriate. As employers, Town Planners should allow staff to expand their knowledge, experience and ability, and give due recognition to their professional contributions.
    • Other Professions To respect the particular expertise of other related professions and to collaborate with them and seek their expertise whenever appropriate to the nature of the task.
    • Remuneration To be remunerated solely by professional fees, according to any Scale of Professional Charges of the respective Institute or Association, or by a salary; and, not to give or receive discounts or commissions. Fees may be waived when a Town Planner acts in an honorary capacity.
    • Advertising Must be honest, moderate, unrelated to other commercial interests, factually accurate and fair to other practitioners.
  3. Each Association or Institute will be responsible for the observance by its members of these Professional Conduct requirements.

The European Council of Spatial Planners holds two General Assemblies during the year: the first one in Spring (generally in Brussels) and the second one in Autumn, hosted by one of our members.

Recap of ECTP-CEU General Assemblies

 

Autumn 2020   To be announced
Spring 2020  8-9 May 2020  Bergen, Norway
Autumn 2019  11-13 September 2019  Plymouth, United Kingdom (GA on the 13th)
Spring 2019  10-11 May 2019  Madrid, Spain
Autumn 2018  16-17 November 2018  Brussels Belgium
Spring 2018  18-19 May 2018  Paris, Roissy, France
Autumn 2017  6-7 October 2017  Leuven, Belgium
Spring 2017  June 30th 2017  Paris, France
Autumn 2016 7-8 October 2016 Ljubljana, Slovenia
Spring 2016 29-30 April 2016 Brussels Belgium
Autumn 2015 October 17th 2015 Dublin, Ireland
Spring 2015 25th of April 2015 Budapest, Hungary
Autumn 2014 17-18 October 2014 IG-Metallhaus, Berlin, Germany
Spring 2014 4th of May 2014 ECTP-CEU HQ – BELO – Brussels, Belgium
Autumn 2013 22nd of September 2013 Cascais, Portugal
Spring 2013 22nd of April 2013 Barcelona, Spain
Autumn 2012 8th of December 2012 Brussels European Liaison Office (BELO)
Spring 2012 9th of June 2012 Istanbul, Turkey
Autumn 2011 5th of November 2011 Palais d’Iéna, Paris, France
Spring 2011 8th of May 2011 Faculty of Architecture, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia
Autumn 2010 15th November 2010 Silken Hotel, Brussels 
Spring 2010 20th May 2010 City Chambers, Edinburgh City Council, Scotland, United Kingdom
Autumn 2009 6 and 7 November 2009 Câmara Municipal de Caminha, Praça do Conselheiro Silva Torres, 4910 Caminha, Portugal
Spring 2009 15th and 16th May 2009 BELO, 63 avenue d’Auderghem, B-1040 Brussels. 
Autumn 2008 24 October 2008 Conference Centre of Dublin Castle, Dublin, Ireland
Spring 2008 16 and 17 May 2008 Centro de Educación Ambiental in Sagunto (Valencia), Spain
Autumn 2007 16 and 17 November 2007 Europa Hotel, Nicosia, Cyprus
Spring 2007 Thursday 24 and Friday 25 May 2007 Brussels European Liaison Office (BELO)
Autumn 2006 Friday 17 November 2006 Colegio de Arquitectos de Andalucía, calle Imagen 4, 41003 Sevilla, Spain
Spring 2006 Friday 19 and Saturday 20 May 2006 SAS Radisson Hotel Norge, Nedre Ole Bulls Plass 4, 5807 Bergen, Norway
Autumn 2005 Friday 18 and Saturday 19 November 2005 Grand Hotel Toplice, Bled, Slovenia
Spring 2005 Thursday 12 and Friday 13 May 2005 Brussels European Liaison Office (BELO)
Autumn 2004 Thursday 20 October 2004 Valdštejnské Palác, Prague, by kind permission of the Senate of the Czech Republic
Spring 2004 Thursday 24 and Friday 25 June 2004 De Markten,  Brussels, Belgium
Autumn 2003 Saturday 21 and 22 November 2003 Laboratório Nacional de Engenharia Civil, 101 Avenida do Brasil, Lisbon, Portugal
Spring 2003 Thursday 26th and Friday 27th June 2003 Palazzo dell’Arte, Milano, Italy
Autumn 2002 7th November 2002 Western European Union, Paris, France
Spring 2002 Thursday 30th and Friday 31st May 2002 Monasterio del Prado, Valladolid, Spain
Autumn 2001 Thursday 25 October 2001 Hotel Relais Mercure, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium.
Spring 2001 Thursday 17 May 2001 Palace of Culture and Science, Warsaw, Poland
Autumn 2000 Thursday 30 November 2000 Department of Trade and Industry, 1 Victoria Street, London
Spring 2000 Thursday 25 and Friday 26 May 2000 Hotel Brugmann, / the government of the Brussels Capital Region, Belgium
Autumn 1999 Thursday 28 and Friday 29 October 1999 Co-ordination Commission for the Region of Lisbon and the Tagus Valley in Lisbon, Portugal
Spring 1999 Thursday 6 and Friday 7 May 1999 Hof van Liere, UFSIA,  Antwerp/Belgium
Autumn 1998 Thursday 3 and Friday 4 December 1998 Corso di Laurea in Pianificazione Urbanistica Territoriale e Ambientale, Venice/Italy
Spring 1998 Thursday 28 May 1998 Hotel Grande Bretagne, Athens
Autumn 1997 20 and 21 November 1997 Palau de la Música, Valencia, Spain
Spring 1997 19 June  1997 Brussels office of Kent County Council, Brussels, and on 20 June 1997 at the Economic and Social Committee, Brussels.

Founding charter

The Founding Charter:

Towards the establishment of common rules for the town planning profession

The Liaison Committee for Town Planners in the EEC was founded in 1978 to advocate professional recognition of planners at European level with the aim of furthering the free movement and the right of establishment of the profession in all Member States. The first President of the Liaison Committee was Charles Delfante, followed by Willem Schut (1980-81) and Hugh Crawford (1982-83). The Committee became an International Association with a Scientific Purpose under Belgian law in 1979. The European Commission decided not to draft a Directive specifically regulating the town planning profession at the EC level, and the Liaison Committee decided to establish common rules for the profession between the national institutes and associations of Town Planners in all Member States of the EC. On 8 November 1985, under the Presidency of Gus Franken, the national associations of town planners which had been members of the Liaison Committee for Town Planners signed an International Agreement and Declaration in Amsterdam, the founding charter of the ECTP. (Historical Background)

In this Charter, ECTP member associations and institutes have laid down the bases for establishing common rules for the planning profession by specifying the field and nature of the professional town planner's activities; educational and training criteria; and professional and conduct requirements.

* The nature and the fields of activity for the town planning profession which are common to all member countries of Europe are defined in Annex A of the Charter. 
* A minimum common core for education and training needed for the planning profession is defined in Appendix B  of the Charter. This is a preliminary step towards the harmonisation of national requirements regarding the education, training and professional conduct of town planners with the view to achieve, in due course, mutual recognition of membership requirements and qualifications among EU member states.
*
A professional code of ethics establishing criteria of professional competence and conduct which will be observed by all member town planners of national associations and institutes in the European Council of Town Planners is defined in Annex C of the Charter.


Click here for: the complete text of the Charter.

Click here for the  signatories of the Charter.

Mission / Aims and objectives

The European Council of Spatial Planners - Conseil européen des urbanistes (ECTP-CEU), founded in 1985, brings together 24 professional town planning associations and institutes from 22 European countries.

It is an umbrella association providing its members with a common framework for planning practice, planning education, continuing professional development and the definition of professional responsibilities.

ECTP sets standards of education and conduct for the planning profession; identifies, celebrates and rewards examples of good planning all over Europe, and engages in dialogue with local, national and European government.

Planners are enablers and specialists in spatial analysis and interaction, committed to working with other professionals across disciplinary boundaries to advance the sustainable development of the both the natural and the built environment.

The current work of the Council includes:

• Dissemination of the Charter of European Planning;
• Dissemination of the European Charter on Participatory Democracy in spatial planning process
• The design of a Vision enhancing the quality and efficiency of cities and urban life in Europe;
• The production of a guide to spatial planning and territorial cohesion;
• The publishing of the proceedings of major conferences on European spatial development and the preparation of forthcoming conferences;
• The preparation of the European Urban and Regional Planning Awards.


Introduction to ECTP-CEU: aims and objectives, activities, members, officers and contact details

Towards the establishment of common rules for the spatial planning profession

In its founding Charter (the Charter of Amsterdam in 1985), ECTP-CEUmember associations and institutes laid down the basis for establishing common rules for the planning profession by specifying the field andnature of the professional spatial planner's activities; educational andtraining criteria; and professional and conduct requirements.

> The nature and the fields of activity for the spatial planning profession which are common to all member countries of Europe are defined in Annex A of the Charter.

> A minimum common core for education and training needed for the planning profession is defined in Appendix B of the Charter. This is a preliminary step towards the armonisation of national requirements regarding the education, training and professional conduct of spatial planners with the view to achieve, in due course, mutual recognition of membership requirements and qualifications among EU member states.

> A professional code of ethics establishing criteria of professional competence and conduct which will be observed by all members of national associations and institutes in the European Council of Spatial Planners is defined in Annex C of the Charter.

The complete text of the Founding Charter and a history of ECTP-CEU are available from the Secretariat and on the website.